I - J - k


I

Icelandic

In Letters from Iceland, W.H. Auden says: "The ordinary cheese is like a strong Dutch and good. There is also a brown sweet cheese, like the Norwegian." Doubtless the latter is Gjetost.

Ihlefield
Mecklenburg, Germany

A hand cheese.

Ilha, Queijo de
Azores

Semihard "Cheese of the Isle," largely exported to mother Portugal, measuring about a foot across and four inches high. The one word, Ilha, Isle, covers the several Azorian Islands whose names, such as Pico, Peak, and Terceiro, Third, are sometimes added to their cheeses.

Impérial, Ancien see Ancien.

Imperial Club
Canada

Potted Cheddar; snappy; perhaps named after the famous French Ancien Impérial.

Incanestrato
Sicily, Italy

Very sharp; white; cooked; spiced; formed into large round "heads" from fifteen to twenty pounds. See Majocchino, a kind made with the three milks, goat, sheep and cow, and enriched with olive oil besides.

Irish Cheeses

Irish Cheddar and Irish Stilton are fairly ordinary imitations named after their native places of manufacture: Ardagh, Galtee, Whitehorn, Three Counties, etc.

Isigny
France

Full name Fromage à la Crème d'Isigny. (See.) Cream cheese. The American cheese of this name never amounted to much. It was an attempt to imitate Camembert in the Gay Nineties, but it turned out to be closer to Limburger. 

In France there is also Crème d'Isigny, thick fresh cream that's as famous as England's Devonshire and comes as close to being cheese as any cream can.

Island of Orléans
Canada

This soft, full-flavored cheese was doubtless brought from France by early emigrés, for it has been made since 1869 on the Orléans Island in the St. Lawrence River near Quebec. It is known by its French name, Le Fromage Raffiné de l'Ile d'Orléans, and lives up to the name "refined."


J

Jack see Monterey.

Jochberg
Tyrol, Germany

Cow and goat milk mixed in a fine Tyrolean product, as all mountain cheese are. Twenty inches in diameter and four inches high, it weighs in at forty-five pounds with the rind on.

Jonchée
Santonge, France

A superior Caillebotte, flavored with rum, orange-flower water or, uniquely, black coffee.

Josephine
Silesia, Germany

Soft and ladylike as its name suggests. Put up in small cylindrical packages.

Journiac 

Julost
Sweden.

Semihard; tangy.

Jura Bleu, or Septmoncel
France

Hard: blue-veined; sharp; tangy.


K

Kaas, Oude
Belgium

Flemish name for the French Boule de Lille.

Kackavalj
Yugoslavia

Same as Italian Caciocavallo.

Kaiser-käse
Germany

This was an imperial cheese in the days of the kaisers and is still made under that once awesome name. Now it's just a jolly old mellow, yellow container of tang.

Kajmar, or Serbian Butter
Serbia and Turkey

Cream cheese, soft and bland when young but ages to a tang between that of any goat's-milker and Roquefort.

Kamembert
Yugoslavia

Imitation Camembert.

Karaghi La-La
Turkey

Nutty and tangy.

Kareish
Egypt

A pickled cheese, similar to Domiati.

Karut
India

Semihard; mellow; for grating and seasoning.

Karvi
Norway

Soft; caraway-seeded; comes in smallish packages.

Kash
Rumania

Soft, white, somewhat stringy cheese named cheese.

Kashcavallo, Caskcaval
Greece

A good imitation of Italian Caciocavallo.

Kasher, or Caher, Penner
Turkey

Hard; white; sharp.

Kash Kwan
Bulgaria and the Balkans

An all-purpose goat's milk, Parmesan type, eaten sliced when young, grated when old. An attempt to imitate it in Chicago failed. It is sold in Near East quarters in New York, Washington and all big American cities.

Kaskaval
Rumania

Identical with Italian Caciocavallo, widely imitated, and well, in Greece, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Transylvania and neighboring lands. As popular as Cheddar in England, Canada and U.S.A.

Kasseri
Greece

Hard; ewe's milk, usually.

Katschkawalj
Serbia

Just another version of the international Caciocavallo.

Katzenkopf, Cat's Head
Holland

Another name for Edam. 

Kaukauna Club
U.S.A.

Widely advertised processed cheese food.

Kauna
Lithuania

A hearty cheese that's in season all the year around.

Kefalotir, Kefalotyi
Yugoslavia, Greece and Syria

Both of these hard, grating cheeses are made from either goat's or ewe's milk and named after their shape, resembling a Greek hat, or Kefalo.

Keg-ripened
see Brand.

King Christian IX
Denmark

Sharp with caraway. Popular with everybody.

Kingdom Farm
U.S.A, near Ithaca, N.Y. The Rutherfordites or Jehovah's Witnesses make Brick, Limburger and Münster that are said to be most delectable by those mortals lucky enough to get into the Kingdom Farm. Unfortunately their cheese is not available elsewhere.

Kirgischerkäse see Krutt.

Kjarsgaard
Denmark

Hard; skim; sharp; tangy.

Klatschkäse, Gossip Cheese
Germany

A rich "ladies' cheese" corresponding to Damen; both designed to promote the flow of gossip in afternoon Kaffee-klatsches in the Konditories.

Kloster, Kloster Käse
Bavaria

Soft; ripe; finger-shaped, one by one by four inches. In Munich this was, and perhaps still is, carried by brew masters on their tasting tours "to bring out the excellence of a freshly broached tun." Named from being made by monks in early cloisters, down to this day.

Kochenkäse
Luxembourg

Cooked white dessert cheese. Since it is salt-free it is recommended for diets.

Koch Käse
Germany

This translates "cooked cheese."

Kochtounkäse
Belgium

Semisoft, cooked and smoked. Bland flavor.

Kolos-monostor
Rumania

Sheep; rectangular four-pounder, 8½ by five by three inches. One of those college-educated cheeses turned out by the students and professors at the Agricultural School of Transylvania.

Kolosvarer
Rumania

A Trappist Port-Salut imitation made with water-buffalo milk, as are so many of the world's fine cheeses.

Komijnekaas, Komynekass
North Holland

Spiked with caraway seeds and named after them.

Konigskäse
Germany

A regal name for a German imitation of Bel Paese.

Kopanisti
Greece

Blue-mold cheese with sharp, peppery flavor.

Koppen, Cup, or Bauden
Germany

Semihard; goat; made in a cup-shaped mold that gives both its shape and name. Small, three to four ounces; sharp; pungent; somewhat smoky. Imitated in U.S.A. in half-pound packages.

Korestin
Russia

Semisoft; mellow; cured in brine.

Kosher

This cheese appears in many countries under several names. Similar to Limburger, but eaten fresh. It is stamped genuine by Jewish authorities, for the use of religious persons. (See Gouda, Kosher.)

Krauterkäse
Brazil

Soft-paste herb cheese put up in a tube by German Brazilians near the Argentine border. A rich, full-flavored adaptation of Swiss Krauterkäse even though it is processed.

Kreuterkäse, Herb Cheese
Switzerland

Hard, grating cheese flavored with herbs; like Sapsago or Grunkäse.

Krutt, or Kirgischerkäse
Asian Steppes

A cheese turned out en route by nomadic tribes in the Asiatic Steppes, from sour skim milk of goat, sheep, cow or camel. The salted and pressed curd is made into small balls and dried in the sun.

Kühbacher
Bavaria

Soft, ripe, and chiefly interesting because of its name, Cow Creek, where it is made.

Kuminost
Norway

Semihard; caraway-seeded.

Kumminost
Sweden

This is Bondost with caraway added.

Kummin Ost
Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Imitation of the Scandinavian, with small production in Wisconsin where so many Swedes and Norwegians make their home and their ost.

Kümmel, Leyden, or Leidsche Kaas
Holland

Caraway-seeded and named.

Kümmelkäse
Germany and U.S.A.

Semihard; sharp with caraway. Milwaukee Kümmelkäse has made a name for itself as a nibble most suitable with most drinks, from beer to imported kümmel liqueur.


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