Q - R

Q

Quartiolo
Italy

Term used to distinguish Parmesan-type cheese made between September and November.

Quacheq
Macedonia, Greece

Sheep, eaten both fresh and ripened.

Quargel see Olmützer.

Quartirolo
Italy

Soft, cow's milk.

Queijos—Cheeses of the Azores, Brazil and Portugal see under their local or regional names: Alemtejo, Azeitão, Cardiga, Ilha, Prato and Serra da Estrella.

Queso Anejo
Mexico

White, dry, skim milk.

Queso de Bola
Mexico

Whole milk, similar to Edam.

Queso de Cavallo
Venezuela

Pear-shaped cheese.

Quesos Cheeses: Blanco, Cartera and Palma Metida see Venezuela.

Queso de Cincho
Venezuela

Hard, round orange balls weighing four pounds and wrapped in palm leaves.

Queso de Crema
Costa Rica

Similar to soft Brick.

Queso de Hoja, Leaf Cheese
Puerto Rico

Named from its appearance when cut, like leaves piled on top of each other.

Queso de Mano
Venezuela

Aromatic, sharp, in four-ounce packages.

Queso del Fais, Queso de la Tierra
Puerto Rico

White; pressed; semisoft Consumed locally,

Queso de Prensa
Puerto Rico

The name means pressed cheese. It is eaten either fresh or after ripening two or three months.

Queso de Puna
Puerto Rico

Like U.S. cottage or Dutch cheese, eaten fresh.

Queso de Tapara
Venezuela

Made in Carora, near Barqisimeto, called tapara from the shape and tough skin of that local gourd. "It is very good fresh, but by the time it arrives in Carora it is often bad and dry." D.K.K. in Bueno Provecho.

Queso Fresco
El Salvador

Cottage-cheese type.

Queville 

Queyras see Champoléon.


R

Rabaçal
Coimbra, Portugal

Semisoft; sheep or goat; thick, round, four to five inches in diameter. Pleasantly oily, if made from sheep milk.

Rabbit Cheese
U.S.A.

A playful name for Cheddar two to three years old.

Radener
Germany

Hard; skim, similar to Emmentaler; made in Mecklenburg. Sixteen by four inches, weight 32 pounds.

Radolfzeller Cream
Germany, Switzerland, Austria

Similar to Münster.

Ragnit see Tilsit.

Rahmkäse, Allgäuer
German

Cream.

Rainbow
Mexico

Mild; mellow.

Ramadoux
Belgium

Soft; sweet cream; formed in cubes. Similar to Hervé

Rammil or Rammel
England

André Simon calls this "the best cheese made in Dorsetshire." Also called Rammilk, because made from whole or "raw milk." Practically unobtainable today.

Rangiport
France

A good imitation of Port-Salut made in Seine-et-Oise.

Rarush Durmar
Turkey

Brittle; mellow; nutty.

Rächerkäse

The name for all smoked cheese in Germanic countries, where it is very popular.

Raviggiolo
Tuscany, Italy

Ewe's milk. Uncooked; soft; sweet; creamy.

Rayon or Raper
Switzerland

A blind Emmentaler called Rayon is shipped young to Italy, where it is hardened by aging and then sold as Raper, for grating and seasoning.

Reblochon or Roblochon
Savoy

Sheep; soft; whole milk; in season from October to June. Weight one to two pounds. A cooked cheese imitated as Brizecon in the same section.

Récollet de Gérardmer
Vosges, France

A harvest variety similar to Géromé, made from October to April

Red
Russia

see Livlander.

Red Balls
Dutch

see Edam.

Reggiano see Grana.

Regianito
Argentine

Italian Reggiano type with a name of its own, for it is not a mere imitation in this land of rich milk and extra fine cheeses.

Reichkäse
German

Patriotically hailed as cheese of the empire, when Germany had one.

Reindeer
Lapland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway

In all far northern lands a type of Swiss is made from reindeer milk It is lightly salted, very hard; and the Lapland production is curiously formed, like a dumbbell with angular instead of round ends.

Relish cream cheese
U.S.A.

Mixed with any piquant relish and eaten fresh.

Remoudon, or Fromage Piquant
Belgium

The two names combine in re-ground piquant cheese, and that's what it is. The season is winter, from November to June.

Requeijão
Portugal and Brazil

Recooked.

Resurrection see Welsh.

Rhubarbe
France

A type of Roquefort which, in spite of its name, is no relation to our pie plant.

Riceys see Champenois.

Ricotta Romano
Italy

Soft and fresh. The best is made from sheep buttermilk. Creamy, piquant, with subtle fragrance. Eaten with sugar and cinnamon, sometimes with a dusting of powdered coffee.

Ricotta
Italy and U.S.A.

Fresh, moist, unsalted cottage cheese for sandwiches, salads, lasagne, blintzes and many Italian dishes. It is also mixed with Marsala and rum and relished for dessert Ricotta may be had in every Little Italy, some of it very well made and, unfortunately, some of it a poor substitute whey cheese.

Ricotta Salata

Hard; grayish white. Although its flavor is milk it is too hard and too salty for eating as is, and is mostly used for grating.

Riesengebirge
Bohemia

Semisoft; goat or cow; delicate flavor, lightly smoked in Bohemia's northern mountains.

Rinnen
Germany

This traditional Pomeranian sour-milk, caraway-seeded variety is named from the wooden trough in which it is laid to drain.

Riola
Normandy, France

Soft; sheep or goat; sharp; resembles Mont d'Or but takes longer to ripen, two to three months.

Robbiole
Robbiola
Robbiolini

Lombardy
Italian

Very similar to Crescenza (see.) Alpine winter cheese of fine quality. The form is circular and flat, weighing from eight ounces to two pounds, while Robbiolini, the baby of the family tips the scale at just under four ounces.

Roblochon, le

Same as Reblochon. A delicious form of it is made of half-dried sheep's milk in Le Grand Bornand.

Rocamadur
Limousin, France

Tiny sheep milk cheese weighing two ounces. In season November to May.

Rocroi
France

From the Champagne district.

Rokadur
Yugoslavia

Imitation Roquefort.

Roll
England

Hard cylinder, eight by nine inches, weighing twenty pounds.

Rollot or Rigolot
Picardy and Montdidier, France

Soft; fermented; mold-inoculated; resembles Brie and Camembert, but much smaller. In season October to May. This is Picardy's one and only cheese.

Roma
Italy

Soft cream.

Romadour, Romadura, and other national spellings
Germany, Austria, Hungary, Switzerland

A great Linburger. The eating season is from November to April. It is not a summer cheese, especially in lands where refrigeration is scarce. Fine brands are exported to America from several countries.

Romano, Romano Vacchino
Italy

Strong: flavoring cheese like Parmesan and Pecorino.

Romanello
U.S.A.

Similar to Romano Vacchino and Old Monterey Jack. Small grating cheese, cured one year.

Roquefort
France

King of cheeses, with its "tingling Rabelaisian pungency." 

Roquefort cheese dressing, bottled
U.S.A.

Made with genuine imported Roquefort, but with cottonseed oil instead of olive, plain instead of wine vinegar, sugar, salt, paprika, mustard, flour and spice oil.

Roquefort de Corse
Corsica, France

This Corsican imitation is blue-colored and correctly made of sheep milk, but lacks the chalk caves of Auvergne for ripening.

Roquefort de Tournemire
France

Another Blue cheese of sheep milk from Languedoc, using the royal Roquefort name.

Rougerets, les
Lyonnais, France

A typical small goat cheese from Forez, in a section where practically every variety is made with goat milk.

Rouennais
France

This specialty, named after its city, Rouen, is a winter cheese, eaten from October to May.

Round Dutch
Holland

An early name for Edam.

Rouy, le
Normandy, France

From the greatest of the cheese provinces, Normandy.

Royal Brabant
Belgium

Whole milk. Small, Limburger type.

Royal Sentry
Denmark

Processed Swiss made in Denmark and shipped to Americans who haven't yet learned that a European imitation can be as bad as an American one. This particular pasteurized process-cheese spread puts its ingredients in finer type than any accident insurance policy: Samsoe (Danish Swiss) cheese, cream, water, non-fat dry milk solids, cheese whey solids and disodium phosphate.

Ruffec, Fromage de
Saintonge, France

Fresh; goat.

Runesten
Denmark and U.S.A.

Similar to Herrgårdsost. Small eyes. "Wheel" weighs about three pounds. Wrapped in red transparent film.

Rush Cream Cheese
England and France

Not named from the rush in which many of our cheeses are made, but from the rush mats and nets some fresh cream cheeses are wrapped and sewed up in to ripen. According to an old English recipe the curds are collected with an ordinary fish-slice and placed in a rush shape, covered with a cloth when filled. Lay a half-pound weight in a saucer and set this on top of the strained curd for a few hours, and then increase the weight by about a half pound. Change the cloths daily until the cheese looks mellow, then put into the rush shape with the fish slice. The formula in use in France, where willow heart-shape baskets are sold for making this cheese, is as follows: Add one cup new warm milk to two cups freshly-skimmed cream. Dissolve in this one teaspoon of fine sugar and one tablespoon common rennet or thirty drops of Hauser's extract of rennet. Let it remain in a warm place until curd sets. Rush and straw mats are easily made by cutting the straw into lengths and stringing them with a needle and thread. The mats or baskets should not be used a second time.


Comments

Popular Posts